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The Art and Architecture of Thailand: From Prehistoric Times Through the Thirteenth Century (Handbook of Oriental Studies. Section 3 Southeast Asia) by Hiram Woodward (Author)

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The Art and Architecture of Thailand: From Prehistoric Times Through the Thirteenth Century (Handbook of Oriental Studies. Section 3 Southeast Asia) by Hiram Woodward (Author)

Product By Brill Academic Publishers

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Book details

  • Hardcover: 297 pages
  • Publisher: Brill, 2nd illustrated edition
  • Language English
  • ISBN-10: 9004144404
  • ISBN-13: 978-9004144408
  • Dimensions: 24.4 x 16.3 x 3 cm

The Art and Architecture of Thailand: From Prehistoric Times Through the Thirteenth Century Description

Written sources on Thai history are scarce. It took Hiram Woodward many years of painstaking archaeological and art-historical research to finally piece together this first ever comprehensive survey work on the art and architecture of Thailand from the earliest times until the establishment of the Thai-speaking kingdoms.

The book, organized geographically and chronologically, covers four eras: the prehistoric period; the period characterized by the culture of the kingdom of Dvaravati; the centuries of Khmer dominance; and, as classical Khmer civilization waned, the period of the struggle for identity.

A systematic and elucidating history of pre-fourteenth-century Thailand in a volume indispensable to historians of art, religion, politics, and society. Readership: All those interested in early Southeast Asia and in understanding the surviving sculpture and architecture produced in Thailand before 1300.

About the Author
Hiram Woodward, Ph.D. (1975) in History of Art, Yale University, is the Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Quincy Scott Curator of Asian Art at the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore. He is the author of The Sacred Sculpture of Thailand: the Alexander B. Griswold Collection, (the Walters Art Gallery, 1997).

Last Updated on Tuesday, 06 October 2009 09:49
 

Art from Thailand by Robert L. Brown (Author)

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Art from Thailand by Robert L. Brown (Author)

Product By Marg Publications

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Book details

  • Hardcover: 104 pages
  • Publisher: Marg Publications,India, illustrated edition (10 Mar 2002)
  • Language English
  • ISBN-10: 8185026467
  • ISBN-13: 978-8185026466
  • Dimensions: 33.2 x 24.9 x 1.4 cm

Art from Thailand by Robert L. Brown Description

This volume provides an overview of Thailand's rich artistic variety. Art found in Thailand (previously named Siam) stretches over more than two millennia. Of great importance and of special interest is a long and intimate relationship between Thailand and India of cultures and artistic traditions, Buddhist and Hindu. The book spans the fourth-nineteenth centuries, from the earliest Indian-related art up until the modern Bangkok period.

Though widely studied, the art history of Thailand today is highly contentious and revisionist, and the articles here present recent research and opinions. The study of art from Thailand has progressed rapidly in the last decades. Scholars have new things to say, new theories, new dating, new ideas regarding artistic relationships and influences. This volume is timely as it presents writers who are involved in this rethinking. They include senior scholars and promising young academics.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 06 October 2009 09:44
 

History of Far Eastern Art (5th Edition) by Sherman Lee (Author)

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History of Far Eastern Art (5th Edition) by Sherman Lee (Author)

Product By Prentice Hall
(6 customers reviews)
Available From 15 Sellers

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Book details

  • Hardcover: 576 pages
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall; 5 edition
  • Language English
  • ISBN-10: 0131833669
  • ISBN-13: 978-0131833661
  • Dimensions: 29.6 x 23.3 x 3.8 cm

The History of Far Eastern Art Description

Covers Himalayan areas--Ladakh, Kashmir, Tibet, and Nepal. New chronologies in Stone age and Bronze Age, China, Korea, and Japan.

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Customer Reviews

"Review..." 2008-08-12
By Allison Cannon (Springfield, MO United States)
It was in great condition when I received it. I have not read it yet, since it is for a college course, and it won't start until the 25th of August. I'm sure it is like any other textbook.

"A comprehensive, flawed survey of the subject" 2002-03-10
By Kenting (San Jose Area, CA USA)
I'm reading this book for an Asian Art class, and I find it has both significant strengths and significant weaknesses.

Its major strength is the integrated approach: Sherman Lee organizes the book chronologically and thematically, rather than geographically. Instead of writing a section on Chinese art and a section on Indian art, Lee organizes his material by stage of development (Stone Age pottery) or by cultural movement (Buddhism), for example tracing the development of Buddhist styles in India, the adoption of those styles in China, Japan, and S.E. Asia, and the eventual synthesis of the Indian influences into local styles incorporating indigenous themes. Lee writes eloquently and even passionately about his subject, letting us know which cultures, styles, and artworks he admires. He covers a vast amount of cultures and time periods, easily enough material for dozens of books.

The book does have significant flaws, however. Most frustrating are the black and white photos (presumably a cost-saving measure). Roughly 90% of the images in the book are black and white, and they cannot do justice to most of the subject matter. A second weakness is Lee's writing style, which is sometimes more eloquent than comprehensible. At times I had to reread a section several times in order to figure out what Lee was trying to say. He sometimes seemes to be addressing himself to an audience of art critics who are already familiar with the material, rather than students encountering it for the first time. He will tell us that a particular art work is hieratic in style, or is an example of Daoist style, without explaining why. Also the thematic, rather than chronological, approach means that some topics are fragmented into parts of different chapters. The material on Korea, Southeast Asia, and the Tang Dynasty seemed especially disjointed. The sections on China in particular need more development: Lee provides only a single page of text on the historically pivotal Qin Dynasty, and does only a fair job explaining the influences of Confucianism and Daoism.

One alternative text that deserves consideration is The Art of East Asia, edited by Gabriele Fahr-Becker. Almost of the photographs are in color, and the text is both more comprehensive and more comprehensible than Sherman Lee, in particular the section on China. The text is written by several different authors, one for each region, which has both advantages and disadvantages -- it avoids the fragmentation of Lee's approach, at the expense of integrating it all into one consistent framework. The key disadvantage of The Art of East Asia (compared to Sherman Lee's History of Far Eastern Art) is that it doesn't include India, which contributed some of Asia's most impressive sculptures, and whose religions had tremendous influence on the rest of Asia.

"Pretty, chronological, detailed." 2001-08-23
By Maggie the Lizard Tamer (NY, NY)

I was required to use this book as a secondary text for a class on early Asian Cultures at NYU. Along with the material presented in class, this book provided great insight into basics of the Asian culture.

This rather heavy book is perfectly organized chronologically and geographically. It provides great graphical supplement to the study of early Asian art. Many artifacts are portrayed, most with detailed description of their history and origin.

I enjoyed my class greatly and this book provided great help to understanding Asian art. If you are a person who prefers visual aids rather than tons of text and would like to learn the basics of Asian art, I highly recommend this book. The photographs are excellent, and more often then not, actually motivate you to reading the descriptions of the portrayed objects. This book will not make you an expert on Asian art, but you'll be able to schmooze your way through at pretentious cocktail parties without any effort.

"what a great deal!" 2000-03-09
By (fairfax, Va USA)
I was required to purchase this book for an oriental art class at VCU. when I went to purchase it in person, most places wated $75 or better for it. Being a student, I am not rich. Amazon had it for the best price and for that I am very happy. points to amazon yet again for having the best price. THANKS!

"No where is there such a broad base of expertise" 1998-10-15
By
Sherman Lee guides us through the ages and territories of the Far East in this study. A study of art following a wonderfully coordinated common theme - ritual and religion. Most noteable is the progress of Buddhism from its origins in India, through Southeast Asia, into China, Korea and finally Japan. Respectable discourse on other arts are included in the tour. Good reading and a great survey of the arts of the Far East.


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Last Updated on Tuesday, 06 October 2009 09:37
 

The Art of Southeast Asia: Cambodia Vietnam Thailand Laos Burma Java Bali (World of Art) by Philip S. Rawson (Author)

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The Art of Southeast Asia: Cambodia Vietnam Thailand Laos Burma Java Bali (World of Art) by Philip S. Rawson (Author)

Product By Thames & Hudson
(3 customers reviews)
Available From 11 Sellers

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Book details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Thames & Hudson, New edition
  • Language English
  • ISBN-10: 0500200602
  • ISBN-13: 978-0500200605
  • Dimensions: 20.8 x 14.7 x 1.8 cm

The Art of Southeast Asia: Cambodia Vietnam Thailand Laos Burma Java Bali (World of Art) Description

Briefly discusses the history of styles of painting, sculpture, and architecture in the countries of Southeast Asia.

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Customer Reviews

"Too Out of Date" 2003-07-13
By Michael Gunther (Maryland, USA)
Rawson's "The Art of Southeast Asia" was written in 1967, almost forty years ago. The current edition is a 1990 reissue in paperback; no changes or updates were made to the original text, and therein lies a real problem.

In the last three decades, there have been tremendous advances in the study of the art and archaeology of SE Asia. This new knowledge has left Rawson's book sadly out of date. (By the way, this is not a criticism of Rawson's scholarship, just a recognition that time marches on.) Unfortunately many of Rawson's interpretations and identifications, which seemed quite reasonable given what was known in the 1960's, are no longer considered correct. For this reason, the book cannot be recommended for most readers.

"The Good, The Bad and The Ugly" 2001-12-19
By (Chicago, IL United States)
The Good -- Covers a lot of territory in a short space. Rawson points out the most important features of the most significant works, and traces artistic developments leading up to them. For each country, Rawson provides a brief historical overview, running from the earliest known history through the the periods of (in his view) the most significant artistic acheivements. This overview is surprisingly helpful in trying to understand the significance that the works (particularly the monuments) had in the societies in which they were created. Rawson also makes some insightful comments about how religious doctrines have shaped artistic development. If you are going to Southeast Asia, this book will give you a basic idea of what to look for. If you are beginning a serious study of Southeast Asian art, this will give you an overview and a context in which to place further studies.

The Bad -- Covers a lot of territory in a short space. As a result, Rawson cannot mention much more than universally acknowledged masterpieces. With the exception of one modern Indonesian painter and a few 14th Century Thai bronzes, one would gather from Rawson that art stopped in Southeast Asia about 1200. This book was originally published in 1967, and a number of Rawson's opinions and his general attitude seem somewhat out of date. Rawson does not like his buildings "overly" decorated, which seems to me a matter of taste -- a taste clearly not shared by most of the societies he describes. He provides almost no description of the "craft" arts, and very little cross-cultural comparison.

The Ugly -- The photographs of the architectural monuments are almost all atrocious. It's conceivable that these were the best available in 1967, but Thames & Hudson should have done something to update them when they reprinted the book in 1993. In addition to simply upgrading the quality of the photographs, some of the monuments have been significantly restored in the intervening years, so more modern pictures would also provide a better of idea of what the buildings were intended to look like. Worst of all, a number of the photographs are split over 2 pages -- the binding down the middle makes it almost impossible to get a decent look at the picture without breaking the book's back.

"An authortative and interesting exploration of SE Asian Art" 2001-02-21
By Angus Cranswick (Newcastle, Australia)
I actually read a much older edition of this book however I feel sure the contents are much the same.

The author certainly has the credentials of a scholar of SE Asian art and having writtten other titles such as "Indian Painting" and "Indian Sculpture" he has deep knowledge of his subject matter as anyone who bothers to read the biographical details and academeic qualifications .

This is not a coffee table type book, however it would genuinely interest anyone who has visited anywhere in SE Asia and seeks a deeper understanding of the many ancient temples and sculpture they will have seen. Certainly a must before visiting any of the great historical sites of Asia such as Angkor Wat or Bodhgaya.

Rawsons text is quite an easy an entertaining read making the sometimes detailed descriptions accessable and interesting.

The book principally deals with the religious sculpture and architecture of the Khmers, Burma and Java and Bali. Vietnam and Thailand receive a fairly brief summary and Laos gets only a brief mention of a page or two. For those readers looking for information on Thailand,Laos and Vietnam the book is still a valuable read because the culture of Cambodia, Burma and Java underpins much of great artistic achievements of SE Asia. Rawson also explains the immense contribution of India to the art of SE Asia and the historical background of the major kingdoms and empires is fascinating.

I would suggest that this book is an ideal beginning for more detailed study of this subject. I enjoyed this book principally because the authors writng style, the very relevant and numerous illustrations and photographs and of course the wealth of interesting information that has opened up a deeper understanding of this subject for me.


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Last Updated on Tuesday, 06 October 2009 09:29
 

Art & Architecture of Cambodia (World of Art) (Paperback) by Helen Ibbitson Jessup (Author)

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Art & Architecture of Cambodia (World of Art) by Helen Ibbitson Jessup (Author)

Product By Thames & Hudson
(3 customers reviews)
Available From 24 Sellers

Product Description

An essential, authoritative, and up-to-date introduction to the art of Cambodia, and a vivid glimpse into a world that continues to challenge travelers.

Legendary tales of kings and princes, wars, conquests, and unions with gods and goddesses—all these are portrayed in the spectacular friezes, reliefs, and stone carvings for which Cambodia has become justly renowned. The enormous variety of styles and influences, both sacred and secular, that are expressed in Cambodian art make this one of the most surprising and rewarding of all Southeast Asian cultures.

Our understanding of the Khmers, whose kingdom dates back to early in the first millennium, is drawn from written Chinese records, myths recorded in Sanskrit, and the evidence revealed by research and exploration that continues to the present day. The profound and lasting influence of India on Khmer culture is evident in Cambodia's religious architecture, principally Hindu and Buddhist temples; each faith is reflected in work of remarkable vigor and exceptional grace and beauty.

French archaeologists in the nineteenth century reopened the doors onto this world. Still more remarkable, perhaps, is how much has survived through generations of determined looting and political conflict. These persistent features of Cambodia's history make the richness and fragility of its architectural and artistic legacy strikingly apparent. World-famous sites, such as Angkor Wat and Preah Vihear, breathtaking monuments in their own right, have tended to overshadow a wealth of lesser-known buildings and complexes buried deep in the jungle.

Many remarkable photographs are published here for the first time, of both famous sites and those that have, until now, been almost impossible to see, for both geographical and political reasons. 180 illustrations, 85 in color.

About the Author
Helen Ibbitson Jessup is an independent scholar and curator specializing in the art and architecture of Southeast Asia.

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Customer Reviews

"Art & Architecture of Cambodia (World of Art) " 2006-11-21
By Monica Allard Ulibarri
It gives you a vague idea of the Cambodian Art & Arquitecture.

"Perfect for travelling" 2005-10-30
By Ferdinand (Germany)
There are some table top books on Khmer art available which are great, but this publication is the only _compact_ book on Khmer art available which gives a stringent, chronological and readable introduction into the history of Khmer art.
Even the best guide (IMHO of course) to Angkor by Michael Freeman and Claude Jacques: "Ancient Angkor" [River Books *2003*, ISBN 9748225275, not listed at Amazon] which of course concentrates on the various temples in Ankor can be confusing concerning the time line and development of Khmer art.
Moreover, Ibbitson Jessup choose many fine examples of Khmer art today on display in the National Museum in Phnom Penh. Which means, if you read the book before travelling you will be able to see the original sculptures later in Cambodia, or even better to read some sections a second time in front of the art works. This will give you a much deeper understanding of everything you will see in Angkor.
This compact and readable introduction to Khmer Art this is IMHO the best travel companion available at the moment and makes a perfect duo with the guide by Freeman/Jaques.

"A little disappointing" 2004-07-31
By reader (NZ)
Not up to T&H's usual standard in terms of production - binding not great (refers to pbk edition), printing of the images below current expected standards. But none of that can be blamed on Jessup - and these faults are the downside of a book which is very cheap for what you get. However, the text is another matter - by no means authoritative as the blurb proclaims - in particular, the first chapter is best left totally unread because of the errors - indicative of which is the howler on page 8 which states that Thai is a Mon-Khmer language - even the most sleepy editor should have spotted that one - unfortunately not the worst example - just the first that jumped out. BUT not all is bad - the selection of images is good and there will be at least some new to people who have an interest in this field, the bibliography has most of the important references and generally the documentation is very good. There are good examples of most of the important aspects of Cambodian art and architecture. If you want a book with a reasonable overview of art and architecture (but not of the Cambodian background) and you don't mind a small format for the photographs, then this is it.


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Last Updated on Tuesday, 22 September 2009 12:18
 
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